Tag Archives: oliver spencer

Essentials Spring 19′

Essentials Spring 19′

 

Oliver Proudlock, Founder

@proudlock

Half light.

Rings.

Beauty for the home.

Designers we adore.


Words & Photography Kirk Truman


 

SERGE DENIMES

RING FINGER

Compass Ring £60

Siler Link Ring £55

Silver Thistle Ring £60

Gold Plated Rope Ring £60

Serge DeNimes is a design-led brand providing exclusive seasonal collections of urban apparel and accessories of premium quality. Founder Oliver Proudlock has had two passions from a young age: fashion and art. They were the two constants in his upbringing, passed on to him by his mother, a designer and photographer. For Oliver, Serge DeNimes is the expression of his creativity and his ambition to create styles that appeal to the creative, streetwise and fashion-conscious around the world.

SERGEDENIMES.COM

 

YMC

CHECK MATE

Turf Pocket Bomber / Tan £650

Dean Shirt / Khaki £110

Tearaway Trouser / Cream £140

Groundhog Jacket / Black/Brown £250

Market Check Trouser / Black/Brown £165

YMC, or ‘You Must Create’, has become one of the most popular brands among young men and women wanting to look and feel good without having to try too hard. With a simple philosophy – you must create your own style – most of the YMC clothing can easily be mixed and matched with any existing piece in your wardrobe. This multi-functional, modern take on design gives the brand’s pieces a timeless yet relevant feel, and leaves the wearer comfortable in the knowledge that any of their pieces will stand the test of time.

YOUMUSTCREATE.COM

OLIVER SPENCER

STRADDLING STREETWEAR

Carrington Jacket / Kemble Blue £319

Theobold Jacket / Kentridge Black £369

Fishtail Trousers / Kentridge Black £179

Robin Crew / Harrop Navy £110

Spencer Sunglasses / Tortoiseshell £185

Self-taught tailor Oliver Spencer launched his eponymous label in 2002, fast becoming the favourite of rock stars and politicians alike. With over 40% of production based in the UK, he champions British industry and marries inspirations from London subcultures, English heritage and American and Japanese urban youth. The result is a signature look straddling streetwear and smart dressing.

OLIVERSPENCER.COM

AMI

HUES & HUES

Camp Collar Overshirt £225

De Coeur T-Shirt £75

Founded in 2011 by the Parisian designer Alexandre Mattiussi, AMI offers a stylish and comprehensive wardrobe that blurs the boundaries between casual and chic. AMI – meaning ‘friend’ in French – stands for a relaxed, authentic and friendly approach to fashion and captures that particular type of Parisian nonchalance that is young, cool and carefree. In 2013, Alexandre was the first men’s designer to win the prestigious ANDAM prize.

AMIPARIS.COM

WOOD WOOD

JUXTAPOSITION MEETS

ICONOGRAPHY

Baltazar shorts £100

Powerphase Trainers £90

Wood Wood’s collections are built around new takes on iconic silhouettes and a sports-fashion approach that remains true to the sub-cultural heritage of the brand. Wood Wood mixes high fashion, sports and streetwear with youth culture, art and music. Always aiming to find the perfect balance between style and functionality, the Wood Wood collections have evolved into tailored and sophisticated expressions while retaining their playful graphic profile that often revolves around juxtapositions and iconography.

WOODWOOD.COM

 

BLEUE BURNHAM

SPOT FOCUS

Soild Signet £275

Surface Signet £275

Cefalu Signet £250

Clerigo Signet £250

Established in 2018, Bleue Burnham is a London-based men’s jewellery brand named after its founder. Through his continual development of form and quality, Bleue explores the notion of British modernism and the role that jewellery plays in this concept, referencing British cultures and traditions to create contemporary and finely crafted pieces of jewellery.

Bleue’s background in sustainability also heavily informs the brand. Environmental and social performance are core elements of its perspective of success. Currently all jewellery is hand-made in London using recycled precious metals and is designed to last multiple generations and be handed down accordingly.

BLEUEBURNHAM.COM

 

MIN NEW YORK

SINGULAR SCENTS 

CODA, 75ml,  £220

 Established in 1999 by Chad Murawczyk, MiN New York creates and curates niche fragrance, beauty and grooming products from around the world. In 2014, MiN New York launched SCENT STORIES, a collection of limited-edition fragrances composed of the finest ingredients from around the world, with a range of 11 scents available to members only for the first year. MiN New York currently has 17 perfumes in its fragrance base. The earliest edition was created in 2014 and the newest is from 2017.

HARRODS.COM

 

MFK

HOME & AWAY

Gentle Fluidity, 70ml £150

Globe Trotter in Zinc Edition, £95

Globe Trotter in Gold Edition, £85

The Maison Francis Kurkdjian collection is a wardrobe of fragrances, representing myriad facets of emotions. Designed in the tradition of luxury French perfumery, it nevertheless represents a contemporary vision of the art of creating and wearing perfume as realised by one of the world’s most celebrated perfumers.

SELFRIDGES.COM

OSTENS

CRAFTMANSHIP & 

PROVENANCE

Impression Cedarwood Heart, £85

 In an age where we all want to know more about craftmanship and provenance, Ostens gives you access to ingredients previously unavailable to consumers. Ostens has an aim: to celebrate and open up access to the ingredients that lie at the heart of so many perfumes and to create sensory wonderment that’s available to all. Their exceptional ‘hero ingredients’ are shared with some of the most talented perfumers in the industry, without any limitations to their creative impulses. The result? Unique olfactive compositions, full of charm and intensity, showcasing creativity in its purest form.

OSTENS.COM

AMAN

HOLISTIC RITUAL

Purifying Hyaluronic Face Hydrator, £75

Nourishing Body Mist, £110

Each product in Aman’s new skincare line is made from powerful natural ingredients that penetrate deep into the skin to nourish and rejuvenate. Together, they work holistically on a deeper level, to meet emotional needs and enhance overall wellbeing.

The rare and precious ingredients used in Aman’s skincare products include actives such as argan stem cells, Kalpariane seaweed extract, and hyaluronic acid, and essential oils ranging from sandalwood, amber, rose and palo santo, to juniper, jasmine and tuberose. Aman Skincare products are suitable for men and women of all ages and skin types.

SHOP.AMAN.COM

BULY

FOR YOU AND YOUR HOME

Vide Poche, £29

Scented Matches, £18

Double Pommade Concrete, £51

Buly is a little bit bonkers – but aren’t all the best things in life? Founded by Jean-Vincent Bully, the brand began in 1803 in a shop on the Rue Saint-Honoré in Paris. Now, after an absence of over a century, the most famous of French beauty dispensaries has risen again to conquer the world. In a spirit of innovation, l’Officine Universelle Buly offers products that draw on the most innovative cosmetic techniques and on the virtues of natural ingredients.

SELFRIDGES.COM

LUMIRA

THE POWER OF FRAGRANCE

Darsana, £49

Infused with the highest quality fine fragrance oils reminiscent of places both near and far, Lumira’s luxury lifestyle essentials are a celebration of beautiful scent, sophisticated design and the spirit of travel. Founded by Almira Armstrong in 2013, Lumira is the manifestation of a life-long love affair with beautiful objects and the differences small details make to our everyday lives. The power of fragrance to trigger the senses, a memory and even a person’s emotional state are the inspirations that led to the creation of the Lumira brand.

SELFRIDGES.COM

 

 

Oliver Spencer

Oliver Spencer


Words & Photography Kirk Truman


“I wanted to open on Berwick Street. I really believed it was the high street of the neighbourhood.”

Farringdon, Portobello, Lambeth: familiar names of London districts, but also those of a range of garments designed by Oliver Spencer, whose clothes, full of stylish accents and practical details, have earned a reputation for distinction, comfort and sheer cool. Designing and making handcrafted garments for modern men and women, Bloomsbury-based Spencer has produced his own individual take on relaxed British style, and a special relationship with the Soho neighbourhood stretching back to his youth.

Having grown up in Coventry, Oli first moved to London in the early 1990s to study art. Frustrated by the limitations of art school, he abandoned his studies and enrolled in what he describes as the University of Life, selling second-hand clothes from a stall at Portobello Market. “Lots of things happened which I would describe as being pivotal in framing where my life would go next. I learnt lots of lessons – some good and some bad,” he says. He woke up at 4.30am every day so he could get his pitch, and it was there on the market stall that his relationship with clothes really began, giving him with an enduring love of the product and a passion for shopkeeping.

Oli spent a decade creating and expanding his first venture, formalwear brand Favourbrook, during which time he designed waistcoats for the 1994 film Four Weddings And A Funeral and began to establish his place on London’s design map. Eight years later, he wanted to embark on a new venture with even greater ambitions – success on the global scene. His plan was to produce a range of clothing that combined the quality and craft of traditional tailoring with a more relaxed modern style. His philosophy: quality needn’t mean formality; casual needn’t mean careless. “I have a feeling towards clothing. It doesn’t matter whether it’s dressing up or dressing down – it’s involved in every step of my life in any case,” he says. “When my customers purchase something from us, I want them to feel a sense of belonging – as if they’ve bought something that’s like their best friend… something they’ve owned forever. Every season, I strive to get there. I want to create clothes that talk to people. Most of my customers like to be seen but not heard – that’s why I don’t brand my stuff.” The Oliver Spencer label was born in 2002, and its founder’s philosophy soon found a number of adherents in the heart of Bloomsbury and beyond. Oli’s arrival in Bloomsbury came about through friend and founder of Folk Clothing, Glaswegian fashion designer Cathal McAteer. The Oliver Spencer brand first came to Lambs Conduit Street in 2007, and Oli’s store at No 62 is home to the latest collection each season, with the original surviving shop fittings making for an immaculately dressed setting.

Since launching on Lambs Conduit Street, Oliver Spencer has continued to expand across London, opening shops in Shoreditch and Soho – an area that’s been important in Oli’s own life since 1989. “I first came here with an ex-girlfriend of mine who was a couple of years older than me. At this point, I was already into fashion. It was the middle of the summer, and I was wearing an old second-hand two-piece check suit with sandals – aged 18. I remember getting some strange looks! People could see I definitely wasn’t from the area,” he says. “My relationship with Soho has always been that of a stranger really. It’s always held this awe for me – I’ve always been a bit scared of it to be honest. When I was a kid at art school, Soho was this tricky place. It felt so grown up, with so much going on all around. To a young kid, it was a bit intimidating. It was full of many different tribes, and not everybody was necessarily nice, especially if you were an outsider coming here. Everywhere you turned, there were dark streets and characters lurking. Since then, my fear has turned into a fascination. On a Friday evening, I know if I get here after 9pm, I won’t be home until at least 3am. Its an absolute vortex.” After opening his Bloomsbury stores, Oli had always planned for Soho to be his next destination. “I knew exactly where I wanted to open: I wanted to open on Berwick Street. I really believed it was the high street of the neighbourhood. It was the first store we opened where the tills began to ring from the very first day… if the shoe fits, as they say.”

Oli is uncompromising in the standards he sets for production and provenance, sourcing the finest fabrics and yarns from artisanal British and Italian mills. He prides himself on producing his garments in only the best European factories and workshops, with around 40 per cent of the collection made here in London or elsewhere in England. Despite the emphasis on British quality, Oliver Spencer’s eye is firmly fixed on the global market. Today, his clothes are stocked in many of the world’s leading department stores, from Selfridges to Liberty of London, and he has opened shops in Toronto and Paris, as well as developing a profitable international online business. With wearers of his brand including Daniel Craig, Tinie Tempah, Alex James and Spandau Ballet’s Gary Kemp, Oli confesses that his next ambition is to become a household name.

oliverspencer.co.uk

@oliverspencer

Oliver Spencer

Oliver Spencer


Words Kirk Truman

Portraits Sandra Vijandi


“Not only does it feel like the centre of Bloomsbury, but it feels like the centre of London in a way…”

Farringdon, Portobello, Lambeth: familiar names of various London districts, but also those of a wealth of garments designed by Oliver Spencer, whose clothes have earned a reputation for distinction, comfort and sheer cool. Designing and making handcrafted garments with stylish accents and practical details for modern men and women, Bloomsbury-based Spencer has produced his own individual take on relaxed British style.

Having grown up in Coventry, Oli first moved to London in the early 1990s to study art. Frustrated by the limitations of art school, he abandoned his studies and enrolled in what he describes as the University of Life, selling second-hand clothes from a stall at Portobello Market. “Lots of things happened which I would describe as being pivotal in framing where my life would go next. I learnt lots of lessons – some good and some bad,” he says. He woke up at 4.30am every day so he could get his pitch, and it was there on the market stall that his relationship with clothes really began, giving him with an enduring love of the product and a passion for shopkeeping.

Oli spent a decade creating and expanding his first venture, formalwear brand Favourbrook, during which time he designed waistcoats for the 1994 film Four Weddings And A Funeral and began to establish his place on London’s design map. Eight years later, he wanted to embark on a new venture with even greater ambitions – success on the global scene. His plan was to produce a range of clothing that combined the quality and craft of traditional tailoring with a more relaxed modern style. His philosophy: quality needn’t mean formality; casual needn’t mean careless. “I have a feeling towards clothing. It doesn’t matter whether it’s dressing up or dressing down  – it’s involved in every step of my life in any case,” he says. “When my customers purchase something from us, I want them to feel a sense of belonging – as if they’ve bought something that’s like their best friend… something they’ve owned forever. Every season, I strive to get there. I want to create clothes that talk to people. Most of my customers like to be seen but not heard – that’s why I don’t brand my stuff.”

The Oliver Spencer label was born in 2002, and its founder’s philosophy soon found a number of adherents in the heart of Bloomsbury and beyond. Ironically, Oli’s arrival in Bloomsbury came about through friend and founder of Folk Clothing, Glaswegian fashion designer Cathal McAteer. “I already loved the shops on Lambs Conduit Street, and then my friend Cathal asked me to open a shop here,” he tells me. “Bloomsbury has come up and up. It’s become a much more residential neighbourhood, but also with many more businesses locating here. It’s a melting pot, and full of academics. You can slide into a pub here and you could end up spending your evening with a doctor or professor, but equally they might work in the film industry or law. Bloomsbury, for me, is a very educated neighbourhood. People here are interesting and very creative: you can feel it when you’re walking down the street. The architecture of the place captivates me – it’s steeped in history. The whole atmosphere of is wonderful. If you think back to its heyday, with the Bloomsbury Group and everything else, you can still really feel it here. With our shops, one – No 58 – was a bookshop, and No 62 was a picture framers. They bound books underneath one, and made frames underneath the other.”

The brand first came to Lambs Conduit Street in 2007. Oli’s store at No 62 is home to the latest collection each season, with the original surviving shop fittings making for an immaculately dressed setting. Underneath the shop, where the framer’s was once based, the Oliver Spencer team is at work making for the main office for the brand. Another prominent fixture below the shop is Oli’s studio, where the collections are designed. The numerous sketches of jackets, shirts and other garments pinned to the wall attest to the work that goes on there. Two doors along, No 58 is home to the Oliver Spencer Shoes & Accessories collection. “The brand is wholly focused on menswear. I’ve got lots going on with it,” he says.

Since launching on Lambs Conduit Street, Oliver Spencer has gone on to expand across London, with shops in Shoreditch and Soho. “Not only does it feel like the centre of Bloomsbury, but it feels like the centre of London in a way. Lambs Conduit Street, to me, is the best street in London, because of the mix of people,” says Oli. “I’d imagine it’s the way London was about 50 years ago, with lots of independent stores based along the street. You can do most things in life on this street; get drunk (or merry), do up your house, dress nice, smell nice and eat well… and that’s where we want to be.”

Oli is uncompromising in the standards he sets for production and provenance, sourcing the finest fabrics and yarns from artisanal British and Italian mills. He prides himself on producing his garments in only the best European factories and workshops, with around 40 per cent of the collection made here in London or elsewhere in England.

Despite the emphasis on British quality, Oliver Spencer’s eye is firmly fixed on the global market. Today, his clothes are stocked in many of the world’s leading department stores, from Selfridges to Liberty of London, and he has opened shops in Toronto and Paris, as well as developing a profitable international online business. With wearers of his brand including Daniel Craig, Tinie Tempah, Alex James and Spandau Ballet’s Gary Kemp, Oli confesses that his next ambition is to become a household name.